Compassion During COVID-19 Pandemic

Why we need to be compassionate during this COVID-19 Pandemic:

Let’s talk about my feelings about this. Now, I know it’s a big deal, but every time I turn on the television or look at Facebook, they’re talking about the COVID-19 cases and the stats. on national and local levels. I understand that it is their job to report these findings, but I think it’s all a bit too much. If you leave the news on all day and you hear that the numbers go up, you will get depressed. The way I get away from it is I go outside, take a walk, or change the channel on the TV or just turn it off or listen to music. Ever since mid-to late January, we’ve been bombarded with COVID-19 in the news cycle. I know the news has to be reported, but I’m just tired of it. I don’t know how you feel, but that’s the way I look at it.

This is how my family has been most affected: my mom is a local schoolteacher in DeKalb County. And she’s been working from home and in the meantime, my personal assistant is not working right now because of the virus. So, my parents are concerned that she might get the virus and she might bring it to our house. My dad has asked that my assistant stays home for the time being until we know it’s safe for her to come back. I cannot wait until social distancing is over! So, we can stop using our phone as our only way of communication.

If you have animals at home, like I do, they might be confused. All they see is that you’re home every day, but I’m sure they like it. Some of you might be working from home like I am and spending more time with your loved ones.

Furthermore, we need to help our neighbors, friends, and people that have chronic disabilities like myself. The people in Washington D.C., our elected officials, are looking at it from a national perspective and not from a local perspective. The governors have a lot on their plate with all these staying at home orders. I think there needs to be a national shut down until we can get this virus under control.

I know the governor of Georgia asked the citizens to NOT go out. I think we can all be a little bit more compassionate for a few more weeks and just leave our home only when it’s necessary. I hope we can stay in a compassionate mode 24/7 when this pandemic is over. Not just in the state of Georgia, but throughout the country. I want to see the news cover more stories of people being compassionate to each other. Not just the national news, but the local news as well. It would be nice, once this pandemic stuff is over, to dedicate a one-day celebration of compassionate activities. Let’s call it “Compassionate Day” for the state of Georgia. Then we can share on social media and other news outlets: photos and videos of the compassionate action that people, cities, and the state is doing to celebrate the day.

I recently found out that there was a 2 trillion-dollar stimulus package that got passed, but I don’t see it helping people like me. I know it’s supposed to be for every American, but does it really take care of everyone? Furthermore, the auto industry has offered to make ventilators. Beer companies have offered to make hand sanitizers until they can do their normal business. Grocery stores have reserved special hours for senior citizens at least 2 days a week. This is all well and good, but will they keep those hours when things get back to normal?

Even the Olympics are being postponed until 2021. I know the President wants to open the country back up in the next few weeks, but I don’t think that should happen because the virus is still spreading. Especially in New York. I would assume that know I don’t like to be in the house for 2-3 weeks, but we have to first figure out a way to stop the spread.

I’ve seen on the local news that there’s now a 14-day stay at home order for the city of Atlanta. There are over 10,000 cases of COVID-19 in Georgia. I don’t think elderly people or people in my condition need to be out until this pandemic is over. The number of cases are increasing daily so before we try to get back to our normal routines, we need to see a significant improvement in those numbers.

During this difficult time, we need to continue our compassionate acts and believe we’re all in this together. We need to continue to practice good hygiene and protect ourselves by washing our hands, wearing masks, and staying home as much as we can. We do not want more lives to be lost by this virus.

Personally, it’s been a huge adjustment working from home. I’m so used to going out to church or the library. Now being home every single day, I don’t mind it, but it’s not what I’m used to. I’ll be glad when we can all get back to our normal routines and schedules.

Jimmy Freels

Intern-Compassionate Atlanta 

http://jimmyfreels.com

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